National Reading Month

nationalreadingmonthAs a writer, I wonder where to start blogging about this wonderful month, designed to raise our awareness of reading.
To be honest, as a mom to two elementary aged girls, I only need stand in line with them at the grocery store to be VERY aware of reading. But my awareness is of them, reading the tabloid headlines while I try to distract them, because who really wants to explain the that Queen isn’t really an alcoholic, hasn’t banished Camilla to the Caribbean and that Princess Diana really wasn’t murdered by the heir to the throne. Oh it makes me think back fondly to the days when they could barely hold a board book.
But then as I consider those simpler days, not permeated by “what’s Alzheimers mummy and will the Queen be alright?” – thanks to another headline – I remember that without their ability to read the tabloids, they wouldn’t be reading Anne of Green Gables with me (we take it in turns) and that Harry Potter Clue would be meaningless without the context of seven trips to Hogwarts together.
Reading is one of the keys to a happy life. Even a housebound person can visit exciting, strange, distant places; they can get wrapped up in a whirlwind romance, fight in a war, or teach school in a frontier town while falling in love with a dashing Mountie (sorry, couldn’t resist).
Reading makes stronger families. Without those 15 minutes where we snuggle up on the sofa to visit Green Gables each evening our days would be so diverse we might not all be in one place and together, but when Mummy opens the book, the girls and even their military father stop what they are doing and come running.
Reading makes better students and workers. Research seems to suggest that if children are reading at grade level by the end of first grade, they will continue on that path, but if they aren’t doing so by then, they are far less likely to by fourth grade. Reading is a muscle and needs to be exercised just like any other. It needs a varied diet of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, silliness, (David Walliams or Roald Dahl anybody) and then something a tiny bit over our heads (Tim Keller or CS Lewis for the grownups, perhaps?)
So as there’s a whole month dedicated to reading, I wondered if I might challenge you to, well, do some reading? It occurs to me that many of us read ourselves to sleep. This has been my MO since I was able to hold a book. But why as authors do we leave a very important part of our work until we are about to nod off? Here’s the challenge – carve out 15 minutes to read during daylight hours. Maybe even write in a reading journal for the month. You could challenge yourself to read out of your traditional genre of choice. Maybe you could jump to nonfiction? Or choose a book of the Bible and a good commentary. It is Lent after all.
As Christian authors, it’s worth remembering that reading the Word also draws us closer to The Lord. Something I consider vital in my writing journey. A dear friend of mine laid down a reading gauntlet just yesterday. She suggested we open the Bible and leave it on our kitchen countertop so as we are moving around we can snatch a few verses here and there. Adding a journal to jot down thoughts on what you read is also advised. The hope and belief is that the more scripture we ingest, the more ammunition we have when in a tricky situation. If we’ve read some, the Holy Spirit can bring it to mind when we find ourselves needing some words.
One of the most challenging talks I’ve ever given was when I was asked to speak on Psalm 119, the longest chapter in the Bible. Oh my! I had read it before, but not paid a ton of close attention. If you haven’t, I would firmly encourage you to do so. It paints a picture of Holy Scripture as a living, breathing, fluid document, and every bit as relevant today as when Jesus walked the earth. This is truth that we are to hide in our hearts, use to bring light to darkness and allow to transform us fully into children of the King. That sort of reading is our legacy and our birthright and available to everyone.
So if nothing else this Lent, be aware of the gift of God’s Word as well as your words and other peoples. The printed page changes lives.
“You can find magic wherever you look. Sit down and relax, all you need is a book.” Dr. Seuss

debbhackettDeborah Hackett is a British member of ACFW’s Virginia chapter. A career radio journalist, she is now enjoying ‘making it up as she goes along’, something that the BBC frowned upon. Deborah lives just outside Washington DC with her husband Willy, a Royal Air Force Pilot and their two daughters. Deborah plays bass, teaches Bible study, loves to take road trips and ski.

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